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George de Hevesy

Nuclear medicine was founded by the Hungarian George de Hevesy (1885-1966), in part in collaboration with Niels Bohr at the University of Copenhagen in the period from 1920 onwards. Nuclear medicine is the principle that one can see into the body by means of radioactive tracers, for example, with PET scans, and can thus diagnose a number of different diseases.

16 February 2010

Part 1: The origin of nuclear medicine 
George de Hevesy is born to Hungarian-Jewish nobility in Budapest in 1885 and as a 25-year old, he begins to think about the ideas that later lead to the invention of nuclear medicine ...

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16 February 2011

Part 2: The tracer technique is developed
George de Hevesy is invited to Copenhagen by Niels Bohr, and here in 1920 he enters into a productive period, where he continues to build on his good idea about trace elements and discovers the element hafnium ...

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16 February 2012

Part 3: The method is refined
George de Hevesy becomes a professor in Germany, but must leave the country in 1934 because of his Jewish background. He returns to Copenhagen, where he continues to refine the tracer method ...

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11 September 2014

Part 4 - Explosion of new knowledge
From 1935 onwards, the group’s knowledge about using radioactive tracers to identify biological and physiological mechanisms exploded and in 1944 it leads to the Nobel Prize for George de Hevesy ...

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16 February 2015

Part 5: Nuclear medicine today
In 1943, George de Hevesy had to once again flee because of Nazism and he lived out the rest of his life in Stockholm. After his death in 1966, nuclear medicine has evolved and revolutionised diagnostics ...

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