Massive support for ESS in the Øresund Region – Niels Bohr Institute - University of Copenhagen

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02 June 2009

Massive support for ESS in the Øresund Region

With very strong support from seven countries, including Germany, France, Denmark and Norway, there is now a clear majority in support of placing the super research facility ESS in the Øresund Region.

ESS - European Spallation Source is an international project like CERN in Switzerland and three countries have tried to attract the project - Hungary, Spain and Sweden.

The decision over the placement is not yet formal, but at a meeting Thursday evening in Brussels ESS Scandinavia received support from France, Germany, Poland, Norway, Estonia and Latvia, and two additional countries, Italy and Switzerland voted for the majority's decision. Only one country pointed to another country.

”We have come a considerable step closer to the placement of a world class research facility being placed in the Øresund Region. A decision that would be of great consequence to the business, research and and education environments in both Sweden and Denmark", explains Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation Helge Sander in a press release from the the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation.

Boost to the research
ESS - European Spallation Source, is a European accelerator project, which will be the world's most powerful neutron source for research in materials from membranes and molecules to magnetic materials and super conductors, technology, for example, for the storage of hydrogen energy and research into all types of surfaces.

”It is absolutely fantastic that ESS will be located in Lund. It will give a boost to the entire Øresund Region, which the university world in Denmark will benefit greatly from - not just in research in physics, but also, for example, in biology, health, the geosubjects and in engineering", explains Professor John Renner Hansen, head of the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen.