Peter Ditlevsen receives EU grant to research abrupt climate change – Niels Bohr Institute - University of Copenhagen

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11 September 2014

Peter Ditlevsen receives EU grant to research abrupt climate change

New EU-collaboration:

The EU has allocated four million Euros (29.7 million kroner) to an international network of researchers who will try to understand critical changes in complex dynamic systems in nature, in technology and in society. Theoretical physicist and climate researcher at the Niels Bohr Institute, Peter Ditlevsen, is involved in the collaboration to interpret climate data and understand abrupt climate change.

Theoretical physicist and climate researcher at the Niels Bohr Institute, Peter Ditlevsen, is involved in the EU-collaboration to interpret climate data and understand abrupt climate change.

The aim of the research network ITN Critics, (International Training Network), is to be able to cope with and anticipate abrupt changes in the dynamics of complex systems including time-dependent and random systems along with chaos-dynamical fluctuations in the environment, climate research, medicine, technology and the financial markets.  

The scientific objective of the project is to develop theories for critical transitions and to apply the theories to identify the specific events that can be used as early warning signals.

The collaboration is led by Imperial College in London and involves leading researchers from across Europe. Peter Ditlevsen from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen works with the dynamics of complex and chaotic systems and is an expert in interpreting climate data. His group researches dramatic climate change and climate dynamics. Peter Ditlevsen will now supervise three new PhD projects and will co-supervise two additional PhD projects in England. This means that the theoretical climate research group at the Centre for Ice and Climate will continue to grow.

Peter Ditlevsen, Associate Professor at the Centre for Ice and Climate, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen. +45 2875-0603, pditlevsen@nbi.ku.dk