Master thesis defense by Martin Braun – Niels Bohr Institute - University of Copenhagen

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Niels Bohr Institute > Calendar > 2012 > Master thesis defense ...

Master thesis defense by Martin Braun

NB! The defence can be followed online here

High-resolution Continuous Flow Analysis of early Holocene ice from the Dome Fuji 1 and three sections from the Renland ice core

Abstract
Ice cores constitute a unique archive of past climatic conditions with records of soluble and insoluble particles that are stored in the ice which provide valuable information about changes in atmospheric circulation patterns and past source as well as site conditions. With Continuous Flow Analysis, a technique measuring this information in a high spatial and temporal resolution, annual variations preserved over thousands of years can be detected with fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy allowing counting of annual layers.
After a short introduction the presentation will give an overview about my work related to the measurement of three sections of the Renland ice core, which were acquired in 1988 and 5m of early Holocene ice from the Dome Fuji 1 ice core recovered between 1995 and 1996 and discuss them within the context of aerosol measurements.
Within this project annual variations could be detected and multiple parameter annual layer counting was conducted for both ice cores.
Results for Renland suggested dust as a suitable main marker throughout all parts showing that reliable dating is possible in spite of the rather difficult topographic conditions. For Dome Fuji sodium was used as main marker and furthermore three distinct volcanic peaks could be detected providing the possibility for matching these peaks to data from the EDML ice core, enhancing reliability of dating efforts.

Supervisors:
Paul Vallelonga, Ass. Professor, Centre for Ice and Climate
Anders Svensson, Ass. Professor, Centre for Ice and Climate
Helga Kromp-Kolb, professor, Institute of Meteorology, University of Nat. Resources and Life Sciences